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Breaking the silence : institutional responses to people who use atypical communication strategies

Crossley, Rosemary (1997) Breaking the silence : institutional responses to people who use atypical communication strategies. PhD thesis, Victoria University of Technology.

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Abstract

This study compares the introduction and expansion of non-speech communication for people with receptive impairments with the introduction and expansion of non-speech communication for people with expressive impairments. It documents the introduction of specific nonspeech communication strategies—sign, augmeiitative communication and facilitated communication—and discusses the controversies which have ensued. It examines institutional responses to the use of atypical communication strategies: in particular, it examines the treatment of people with communication impairments by the state and the reaction of the legal and professional establishments to the introduction of new communication techniques. The primary hypothesis guiding the study was that repeating patterns would appear, both in attempts to change the status of different groups and in professional intervention and reaction. The secondary hypothesis was that the group recognised longest—the deaf—would have come closest to achieving acceptance. Both hypotheses were supported to some extent. It is possible to discern repeating pattems both in the introduction of new communication techniques and in attempts by professional groups to control their use; and while people who cannot hear have not yet achieved full acceptance and understanding, they are considerably closer to both than are people with diagnoses of physical or intellectual impairment who cannot speak.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: People with disabilities, Communication, communicative disorders, nonverbal communication, sign language, discrimination, augmentative communication, facilitated communication
Subjects: Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Communication and the Arts
FOR Classification > 1608 Sociology
FOR Classification > 2001 Communication and Media Studies
Depositing User: VU Library
Date Deposited: 07 May 2010 06:12
Last Modified: 23 May 2013 16:42
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/15389
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