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Attention, processing speed and executive functions in children with obstructive and communicating hydrocephalus

Cordy, Nerissa (2004) Attention, processing speed and executive functions in children with obstructive and communicating hydrocephalus. Other Degree thesis, Victoria University of Technology.

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Abstract

Hydrocephalus (HC) is a condition involving an increased volume of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) in the ventricular system, caused by a variety of prenatal and postnatal aetiologies. In obstructive H C there is an obstruction to the flow of CSF and in communicating HC there is an interference with the reabsorption of the CSF while the ventricular pathways remain functional. The compressive effects of HC may lead to thinning and stretching of the corpus callosum, and also damage projection fibres, optic tracts and olfactory pathways. Consistent with this neuropathology, progressive HC in early childhood may result in neuropsychological impairment such as gross and fine motor deficits, spatial perceptual problems, and slowed processing speed. To date there is a paucity of research that compares the neuropsychological functioning of children with obstructive and communicating H C . This study aimed to compare attention, processing speed and executive functions in children with obstructive and communicating HC.

Item Type: Thesis (Other Degree thesis)
Additional Information:

Doctor of Psychology (Clinical Neuropsychology)

Uncontrolled Keywords: aetiology, neuroanatomy, pathophysiology, obstructive hydrocephalus, communicating hydrocephalus, mental attention, cognition, mental processing speed, executive functions, children, cerebrospinal fluid, cerebral spinal fluid, neuropsychological, cognitive problems, behavioural problems
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1702 Cognitive Science
FOR Classification > 1701 Psychology
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Social Sciences and Psychology
Depositing User: VU Library
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2011 05:57
Last Modified: 23 May 2013 16:46
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/16095
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