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Comparing the impact of leader-member exchange, psychological empowerment and affective commitment upon Australian public and private sector nurses: implications for retention

Brunetto, Yvonne and Shacklock, Kate and Bartram, Timothy and Leggat, Sandra G and Farr-Wharton, Rod and Stanton, Pauline and Casimir, Gian (2012) Comparing the impact of leader-member exchange, psychological empowerment and affective commitment upon Australian public and private sector nurses: implications for retention. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 23 (11). pp. 2238-2255. ISSN 0958-5192 (print) 1466-4399 (online)

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Abstract

This study uses Leader – Member Exchange (LMX) theory to test the associations between the supervisor – subordinate relationship, psychological empowerment and affective commitment amongst 1283 nurses working in Australian public and private hospitals. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected, analysed and presented. The findings show that the quality of LMX is more important in public sector nursing contexts than in the private sector with regard to the relationship between empowerment and affective commitment. Furthermore, the relationship between empowerment and affective commitment is stronger for nurses in public sector organisations with low-quality LMX than for nurses in public sector organisations with high-quality LMX. As empowerment and affective commitment are both predictors of staff retention, the findings can assist in developing targeted current and future retention strategies for healthcare management.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID25734, affective commitment, leader member exchange, nurses, psychological empowerment, Australia
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Management and Information Systems
Depositing User: Yimin Zeng
Date Deposited: 24 Jul 2014 06:41
Last Modified: 24 Jul 2014 06:41
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/23232
DOI: 10.1080/09585192.2011.616524
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