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Enhancement drug use in society and in sport: the science and sociology of stimulant use and the importance of perception

Outram, Simon M and Stewart, Bob (2013) Enhancement drug use in society and in sport: the science and sociology of stimulant use and the importance of perception. Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, 16 (6). pp. 789-804. ISSN 1743-0437 (print) 1743-0445 (online)

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Abstract

The use of enhancement drugs attracts considerable academic, media and public attention. Such enhancement practices range from the illicit use of medications to the legal use of caffeine. This paper reviews the risks, benefits and regulatory status of those drugs associated with both sporting and cognitive enhancement. The purpose of this paper is to forefront what we know about such drugs – and especially stimulants – prior to entering into discussion over their ethical implications. While the evidence suggests stimulants can improve sporting performance, the evidence to confirm cognitive gains is much weaker. We consequently recommend that academics, the media and regulators should avoid making exaggerated claims about such drugs, and avoid implying that their use is more common than evidence currently suggests.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID26685, ResPubID25568, stimulants, sports, cognitive enhancers, cognition, perceptions, ethics
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
FOR Classification > 1702 Cognitive Science
FOR Classification > 2201 Applied Ethics
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
Depositing User: Ms Phung.T Tran
Date Deposited: 18 Dec 2013 00:05
Last Modified: 14 May 2014 19:39
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/23696
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/17430437.2012.753529
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Citations in Scopus: 1 - View on Scopus

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