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Nitrite and nitric oxide metabolism in peripheral artery disease

Allen, Jason, Giordano, Tony and Kevil, Christopher G (2012) Nitrite and nitric oxide metabolism in peripheral artery disease. Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry, 26 (4). pp. 217-222. ISSN 1089-8603

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Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) represents a burgeoning form of cardiovascular disease associated with significant clinical morbidity and increased 5 year cardiovascular disease mortality. It is characterized by impaired blood flow to the lower extremities, claudication pain and severe exercise intolerance. Pathophysiological factors contributing to PAD include atherosclerosis, endothelial cell dysfunction, and defective nitric oxide metabolite physiology and biochemistry that collectively lead to intermittent or chronic tissue ischemia. Recent work from our laboratories is revealing that nitrite/nitrate anion and nitric oxide metabolism plays an important role in modulating functional and pathophysiological responses during this disease. In this review, we discuss experimental and clinical findings demonstrating that nitrite anion acts to ameliorate numerous pathophysiological events associated with PAD and chronic tissue ischemia. We also highlight future directions for this promising line of therapy.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ischemia, angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, vasodilation, exercise, blood flow
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1101 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics
FOR Classification > 1102 Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > College of Sports and Exercise Science
Depositing User: Ms Julie Gardner
Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2014 07:25
Last Modified: 26 Sep 2014 07:14
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/25746
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.niox.2012.03.003
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Citations in Scopus: 37 - View on Scopus

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