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Factors affecting recruitment in populations of Spiny Rice-flower (Pimelea spinescens Rye subspecies spinescens) in Victoria’s natural temperate grasslands: relationships with management practices, biological and ecological characteristics

Reynolds, Deborah Michelle (2013) Factors affecting recruitment in populations of Spiny Rice-flower (Pimelea spinescens Rye subspecies spinescens) in Victoria’s natural temperate grasslands: relationships with management practices, biological and ecological characteristics. PhD thesis, Victoria University.

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Abstract

Pimelea spinescens Rye subspecies spinescens is an endemic subshrub found within temperate grasslands of the Victorian volcanic plains. It is listed as critically endangered under the Federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). Efforts to bolster populations using horticultural techniques have been largely unsuccessful. For long-term survival it is necessary to successfully germinate seed and employ methods which encourage wild populations to reproduce in situ. The aim of this research was to identify which factors of the biology, ecology and management of P. spinescens populations, significantly affect the species’ in situ recruitment potential.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: grassland ecology, flowers, environmental management, botany, endemic subshrubs, native vegetation, conservation, population density, biomass, seed germination, recruitment potential, Victoria
Subjects: FOR Classification > 0502 Environmental Science and Management
FOR Classification > 0602 Ecology
FOR Classification > 0607 Plant Biology
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > College of Science and Engineering
Depositing User: VU Library
Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2015 22:20
Last Modified: 12 Jan 2015 22:20
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/25922
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