Research Repository

Transition to IFRS and its Implications for Accounting Education in Saudi Arabia

Albader, Mohammed (2015) Transition to IFRS and its Implications for Accounting Education in Saudi Arabia. Other Degree thesis, Victoria University.

[img] Text
Mohammed Albader.pdf

Download (2MB)

Abstract

The adoption of a unified set of accounting standards has implications for the accounting profession and accounting education. Identifying these implications is important for the efficient and effective transition to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Yet, there is limited research into adopting IFRS in countries with developing economies that have differing legal, economic and social structures. Saudi Arabia’s decision to transition to IFRS in 2012, as announced by the Saudi Organisation for Certified Public Accountants (SOCPA), has resulted in a need to examine the effect of this transition on accounting education in Saudi Arabia, specifically on the way higher education institutions will incorporate IFRS into the curriculum as a principles-based approach to adopting accounting standards. This study is underpinned by an educational theoretical framework of curriculum implementation. The framework was employed to answer the research questions that address the influences on the adoption of IFRS for accounting educators in Saudi Arabia. The results of the research are intended to inform professional bodies in Saudi Arabia, and more generally in developing countries, of the factors affecting curriculum development in accounting that incorporates IFRS. This study also examines the educational transition to IFRS from an Islamic perspective.

Item Type: Thesis (Other Degree thesis)
Additional Information:

Doctor of Business Administration

Uncontrolled Keywords: accounting curriculum, continuing professional development, accounting standards, Islamic accounting, higher education, Saudi Arabia
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy
FOR Classification > 1501 Accounting, Auditing and Accountability
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > College of Business
Depositing User: VU Library
Date Deposited: 23 Dec 2015 02:09
Last Modified: 23 Dec 2015 02:09
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/29787
ePrint Statistics: View download statistics for this item

Repository staff only

View Item View Item

Search Google Scholar