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Capacity Improvement Using Adaptive Sectorisation in WCDMA Cellular Systems With Non-Uniform and Packet Mode Traffic

Nguyen, Trung Van (2005) Capacity Improvement Using Adaptive Sectorisation in WCDMA Cellular Systems With Non-Uniform and Packet Mode Traffic. PhD thesis thesis, Victoria University.

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Abstract

CDMA cellular mobile systems find widespread acceptance particularly in regional centres where there are large geographical areas to cover. However, temporal changes of user density due to formation of congregated population centres (called hot spots) can seriously undermine the system design goals in terms of quality of service (QoS) and system capacity. This investigation deals with the problem of hot spots in a bid to improve system capacity at acceptable quality of service levels. Among the techniques considered is the adaptive ectorisation and its implementation with finite antenna beam switching. The future wireless communications systems are expected to offer a wide variety of services, which have vastly differing QoS requirements. To handle this, the third generation cellular mobile communication systems are designed to carry packet mode traffic. This investigation also deals with the impact of third generation cellular system traffic on system capacity. It examines the system activity in the presence of mixed mode traffic and the capacity and QoS trade-offs possible in Wideband CDMA (WCDMA) cellular systems. Application of adaptive sectorisation to improve capacity in such systems when confronted with hot spots is also investigated. It is found that in all situations the adaptive sectorisation brings an overall improvement to system capacity and this is particularly significant when the user concentration in hot spots is substantially bigger than that of the rest of the cell.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: capacity improvement; adaptive sectorisation; WCDMA cellular systems; packet mode traffic
Subjects: RFCD Classification > 290000 Engineering and Technology
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Engineering and Science
Depositing User: Mr Angeera Sidaya
Date Deposited: 16 Feb 2006
Last Modified: 23 May 2013 17:11
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/309
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