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Aerobic training increases the stimulated percentage of CD4+CD25+ in older men but not older women

Broadbent, Suzanne and Gass, Gregory (2008) Aerobic training increases the stimulated percentage of CD4+CD25+ in older men but not older women. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 103 (1). pp. 79-87. ISSN 1439-6319

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Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether 12 months of moderate intensity cycling would increase the expression of IL-2 (CD25+) receptors in T helper (CD4+) lymphocytes in men and women aged 65– 75 years. Fourteen men and 10 women completed 52 weeks of moderate intensity cycling (60% VO2peak). Subjects trained (TR) three times per week for 45 min per session. Eight age-matched untrained (UT) male and eight UT female subjects acted as controls. Resting blood samples were taken from TR and UT subjects every 4 weeks. Leukocyte concentration was measured using a full blood count. PHA-stimulated CD4+ lymphocytes were analysed for changes in the expression of CD25+, by Xow cytometry. Training signiWcantly increased VO2peak (l min¡1, ml kg¡1 min¡1) in male (+14.3, +16%) and female (+16.7, +27.8%) groups. The TR male group showed a signiWcantly lower percentage of CD4+CD25+ than the male UT in January but the TR male percentage was signiWcantly higher than the UT male group during February, March, April, May, June, September B and December. The female TR group showed a signiWcantly higher percentage CD4+CD25+ than the female UT only during July. There were also signiWcant sequential monthly changes in the percentage of CD4+CD25+ for male and female UT and TR groups. SigniWcant increases in the percentage of CD4+CD25+ in the male TR group suggest training-enhanced lymphocyte mitogenic responsiveness. Moderate intensity long-term training may increase the recruitment of active memory CD4+CD25+ in men rather than women.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID16822. IL-2 • IL-2R, lymphocyte response, moderate intensity training
Subjects: Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Sport and Exercise Science
FOR Classification > 0606 Physiology
SEO Classification > 970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2011 06:32
Last Modified: 25 Mar 2013 00:48
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/3534
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Citations in Scopus: 2 - View on Scopus

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