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The effects of physiological acidosis on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function, ROS balance, and intracellular signalling

Hedges, Christopher (2017) The effects of physiological acidosis on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function, ROS balance, and intracellular signalling. PhD thesis, Victoria University.

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Abstract

Mitochondrial adaptation in skeletal muscle is promoted by a diverse array of stimuli, and changes in mitochondrial plasticity have been noted as a result of a many exercise modalities. High-intensity interval training is one such modality that promotes mitochondrial adaptation in response to repeated short-duration bouts of intense effort. Another result of intense muscular effort is a decrease in muscle pH, resulting in intracellular acidosis. The effect of this acidosis on oxygen consumption in muscle has received attention previously, with mixed findings. An aspect of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function that has received limited attention is the production of reactive oxygen species. To date a small number of studies have also provided evidence that attenuating the development of intracellular acidosis may have beneficial effects for mitochondrial adaptation. This thesis aimed to further investigate the effect of acidosis on mitochondrial function, and on intracellular signalling for mitochondrial biogenesis.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: reactive oxygen species, metabolism, muscles, cells, signals, exercise, enzymes, ADP sensitivity, adenosine diphosphate, rats, extracellular pH
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1101 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics
FOR Classification > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
FOR Classification > 1116 Medical Physiology
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > College of Sports and Exercise Science
Depositing User: VU Library
Date Deposited: 16 Apr 2018 02:28
Last Modified: 16 Apr 2018 02:28
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/35976
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