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Probiotics, Immunomodulation, and Health Benefits

Gill, Harsharn and Prasad, Jaya (2008) Probiotics, Immunomodulation, and Health Benefits. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 606. pp. 423-454. ISSN 0065-2598

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Abstract

Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amount, confer a health benefit on the host. Amongst the many benefits associated with the consumption of probiotics, modulation of the immune system has received the most attention. Several animal and human studies have provided unequivocal evidence that specific strains of probiotics are able to stimulate as well as regulate several aspects of natural and acquired immune responses. There is also evidence that intake of probiotics is effective in the prevention and/or management of acute gastroenteritis and rotavirus diarrhoea, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and intestinal inflammatory disorders such as Crohn’s disease and pouchitis, and paediatric atopic disorders. The efficacy of probiotics against bacterial infections and immunological disorders such as adult asthma, cancers, diabetes, and arthritis in humans remains to be proven. Also, major gaps exist in our knowledge about the mechanisms by which probiotics modulate immune function. Optimum dose, frequency and duration of treatment required for different conditions in different population groups also remains to be determined. Different probiotic strains vary in their ability to modulate the immune system and therefore efficacy of each strain needs to be carefully demonstrated through rigorously designed (randomised, doubleblind, placebo-controlled) studies. This chapter provides an over view of the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics in health and disease, and discusses possible mechanisms through which probiotics mediate their disparate effects.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID16392. probiotics, immune system, health benefits, immunomodulatory effects
Subjects: Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Biomedical and Health Sciences
FOR Classification > 1107 Immunology
SEO Classification > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 13 Oct 2011 04:18
Last Modified: 25 Mar 2013 01:11
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/3673
DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-74087-4_17
ePrint Statistics: View download statistics for this item
Citations in Scopus: 65 - View on Scopus

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