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Together but Separated: The Acculturation Experience of Latin American Women in Australia

Aizpurúa, Romina Iebra and Fisher, Adrian T (2008) Together but Separated: The Acculturation Experience of Latin American Women in Australia. The Australian Community Psychologist, 20 (2). pp. 30-43. ISSN 18357393

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Abstract

Immigrants to a new land face significant acculturation issues. Although definitions of acculturation reflect a mutual change, most research and positioning considers this to be, mostly, a one-way process. It is also perceived as a process that seems to have an end point, and is reasonably comparable across all members of a group. In the current research, the position of 13 Latin American immigrant women, with an average of 32 years in Australia, is considered. Data from interviews indicated that acculturation is still an ongoing process for these women, with many barriers imposed. English language proficiency is seen as a key element for them to integrate, but they still face issues of overt and covert discrimination on grounds of accent and skin colour and expectations of assimilation. The challenges of acculturation are compounded for the women as they were often excluded from the original decisions to emigrate, had to establish a new household and life – but did not have the necessary formal and informal social support networks on which to draw.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID15700, immigrants, acculturation issues, Latin American immigrant women, barriers, English language proficiency, integration, overt and covert discrimination, formal and informal social support networks
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1608 Sociology
FOR Classification > 1701 Psychology
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Social Sciences and Psychology
SEO Classification > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
FOR Classification > 1603 Demography
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 26 Aug 2011 01:06
Last Modified: 27 Feb 2014 03:05
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/3723
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