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Alleviating Choking: The Sounds of Distraction

Mesagno, Christopher and Marchant, Daryl and Morris, Tony (2009) Alleviating Choking: The Sounds of Distraction. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 21 (2). pp. 131-147. ISSN 1041-3200

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Abstract

“Choking” is defined as a critical deterioration in the execution of habitual processes as a result of an elevation in anxiety levels under perceived pressure, leading to substandard performance. In the current study, music was used in a “dual-task” paradigm to facilitate performance under pressure. Three “choking-susceptible” experienced female basketball players were purposively sampled from 41 screened players. Participants completed 240 basketball free throws in a single-case A1-B1-A2-B2 design (A phases = “low-pressure” and B phases = “high-pressure”), with the music intervention occurring during the B2 phase. Following completion of the phases, an interview was conducted to examine perceptions of choking and cognitions associated with the effects of the music lyrics. Participants improved performance in the B2 phase, and explained that choking resulted from an increase in public self-awareness (S-A). The music intervention decreased S-A, and enabled participants to minimize explicit monitoring of execution and reduce general distractibility.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID18243, choking, distraction, music intervention, coping strategies, sport performance
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1701 Psychology
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Sport and Exercise Science
SEO Classification > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 03 May 2012 01:47
Last Modified: 03 May 2012 01:47
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/4461
DOI: 10.1080/10413200902795091
ePrint Statistics: View download statistics for this item
Citations in Scopus: 18 - View on Scopus

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