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Duration of anaesthesia, type of surgery, respiratory co-morbidity, predicted VO2Max and smoking predict postoperative pulmonary complications after upper abdominal surgery: an observational study

Scholes, Rebecca and Browning, Linda and Sztendur, Ewa M and Denehy, Linda (2009) Duration of anaesthesia, type of surgery, respiratory co-morbidity, predicted VO2Max and smoking predict postoperative pulmonary complications after upper abdominal surgery: an observational study. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 55 (3). pp. 191-198. ISSN 0004-9514

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Abstract

Question: Can the risk of developing postoperative pulmonary complications be predicted after upper abdominal surgery? Design: Prospective observational study. Participants: 268 consecutive patients undergoing elective upper abdominal surgery who recieved standardised pre-and postoperative prophylactic respiratory physiotherapy. Outcome measures: Predictors were 17 preoperative and intraoperative risk factors. a psotoperative pulmonary complication was diagnosed when four or more of the following criteria were present: radiological evidence of collapse/consolidation, temperature >38 degrees C, oxyhaemoglobin saturation <90%, abnormal sputum production, sputum culture indicating infection, raised white cell count, abnormal auscultation findings, or physicians diagnosis of pulmonary complication. Results: 35 participants (13%) developed postoperative pulmonary complications. Five risk factors predicted postoperative pulmonary complications: duration of anaesthesia (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.7 to 10.8); surgical category (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.7); current smoking (OR 2.1, 95% C! 1.0 to 4.5); respiratory co-morbidity (OR 2.1 95% CI 1.0 to 4.4); and predicted maximal oxygen uptake (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0 to 4.3). A clinical rule for predicting the development of postoperative pulmonary complications predicted 82% of participants who developed complications. The odds of high risk participants developing pulmonary complications were 8.4 (95% CI 3.3 to 21.3) times that of low risk participants. Conclusion: This clinical rule for predicting the risk of developing postoperative pulmonary complications from the five risk factors may prove useful in prioritising postoperative respiratory physiotherapy. Further research is needed to validate the rule.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID17853, surgery, risk, postoperative complications, prevention and control, physical therapy modalities, adult, postoperative care
Subjects: Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Centre for Collaborative Learning and Teaching (CCLT)
FOR Classification > 1117 Public Health and Health Services
SEO Classification > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2011 04:51
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2014 22:38
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/4568
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Citations in Scopus: 12 - View on Scopus

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