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Combined cycle and run performance is maximised when the cycle is completed at the highest sustainable intensity

Suriano, Robert and Bishop, David (2010) Combined cycle and run performance is maximised when the cycle is completed at the highest sustainable intensity. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 110 (4). pp. 753-760. ISSN 1439-6319 (print) 1439-6327 (online)

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cycle intensity on subsequent running performance and combined cycle–run (CR) performance. Seven triathletes undertook a cycling graded exercise test to exhaustion, an isolated 500-kJ cycle time trial (CTT) and an isolated 5-km running time trial. Then they performed a series of CR tests, at various cycle intensities, followed by an all-out, 5-km run. The CR tests were separated into four categories based on the percentage of the CTT at which the cycle was performed (CR 81–85%, CR 86–90%, CR 91–95%, and CR 96–100%). Running performance was slower during CR 96–100% compared to CR 81–85% and CR 86–90% (20:45 ± 1:19 vs. 19:56 ± 0:40 and 19:46 ± 0:49 min; P < 0.05), but not CR 91–95% (20:19 ± 1:08 min; P > 0.05). CR performance was maximised during CR 96–100% when compared to CR 81–85, CR 86–90 and CR 91–95% (56:37 ± 4:04 vs. 62:40 ± 5:30, 59:53 ± 4:41 and 58:29 ± 4:40 min; P < 0.05). The results suggest that combined cycle and run performance is maximised when the cycle is completed at the highest sustainable intensity.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID21147, triathlon, pacing, endurance performance, bicycling, exercise test, physical endurance, running
Subjects: Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
FOR Classification > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
SEO Classification > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 11 May 2012 04:36
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2014 03:25
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/7046
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-010-1547-y
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Citations in Scopus: 3 - View on Scopus

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