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The effect of high velocity low amplitude manipulation on the amelioration of cervical spine rotation asymmetries: is the cavitation important?

Strachan, Donovan (2004) The effect of high velocity low amplitude manipulation on the amelioration of cervical spine rotation asymmetries: is the cavitation important? Coursework Master thesis, Victoria University.

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Abstract

Background: High velocity low amplitude (HVLA) thrust techniques are commonly used by manual therapists. One of the primary goals of these techniques is to increase the range of motion within spinal segments. Still, there is much contention about the outcomes of the audible release or cavitation associated with these techniques. This study is to investigate the effect that HVLA thrust techniques has on total cervical ROM asymmetries with and without cavitation. Conclusion: HVLA thrust technique to the AA joint with cavitation produced a significant amelioration in total cervical rotation asymmetry immediately post-manipulation. A significant amelioration in toal cervical rotation asymmetries was not found when HVLA failed to produce a cavitation. The reduction in the asymmetry immediately post-manipulation had reduced or returned to the pre-manipulation level at 30 minutes post-manipulation. This minor thesis was written by a post-graduate student as part of the requirements of the Master of Health Science (Osteopathy) program.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: manipulation, cavitation, cervical ROM, asymmetry, atlanto-axial joint, amelioration, osteopathy, Osteopathy Masters Projects
Subjects: RFCD Classification > 320000 Medical and Health Sciences
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Centre for Ageing, Rehabilitation, Exercise & Sport Science (CARES)
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Sport and Exercise Science
Depositing User: Tracey Prelec
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2008
Last Modified: 23 May 2013 16:39
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/717
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