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Short-term effects of a non-dieting lifestyle intervention program on weight management, fitness, metabolic risk, and psychological well-being in obese premenopausal females with the metabolic syndrome

Carroll, Sean and Borkoles, Erika and Polman, Remco (2007) Short-term effects of a non-dieting lifestyle intervention program on weight management, fitness, metabolic risk, and psychological well-being in obese premenopausal females with the metabolic syndrome. Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, 32 (1). pp. 125-142. ISSN 1715-5312

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Abstract

Lifestyle modification has been widely acknowledged as the primary treatment for the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We examined the short-term effects of a non-dieting lifestyle intervention program, within the theoretical psychological framework of self-determination theory (SDT), on metabolic fitness and psychological well-being among premenopausal, clinically obese women. A secondary analysis of a randomized, controlled, 3 month, intensive, community-based lifestyle intervention study was performed on 31 pre-menopausal obese women with the MetS (56.4% of original study sample). These participants had been randomly allocated to a non-dieting lifestyle intervention group (n = 17) or waiting list control (n = 14). Among participants who completed repeat anthropometric and cardiorespiratory fitness measurements after 3 months intervention, the lifestyle intervention group showed a significant improvement in VO2 (mL·kg–1·min–1) compared with control (test for interaction, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found for body mass. Metabolic improvements were evident for diastolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in both groups. The lifestyle intervention group also showed significantly improved general psychological well-being compared with the control group (test for interaction, p = 0.0005). All of the psychological well-being subscales showed significant favourable changes in the intervention group as compared with controls. This short-term, non-dieting lifestyle intervention, consistent with the “Health at Every Size” (HAES) obesity treatment paradigm, significantly improved cardiorespiratory fitness and psychological well-being. Metabolic risk tended to improve after 3 months intervention with no significant difference in the resolution of the MetS between intervention and control participants.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

Online ISSN: 1715-5320

Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID21936. metabolic syndrome, lifestyle intervention, psychological well-being, obesity, cardiorespiratory fitness, non-dieting approach, self-determination
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1101 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics
FOR Classification > 1701 Psychology
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
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Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 16 Feb 2012 01:35
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2015 00:38
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/7914
DOI: 10.1139/H06-093
ePrint Statistics: View download statistics for this item
Citations in Scopus: 18 - View on Scopus

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