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Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise: a focus on reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide signaling

Merry, Troy L and McConell, Glenn K (2009) Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise: a focus on reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide signaling. IUBMB Life, 61 (5). pp. 479-484. ISSN 1521-6543 (print) 1521-6551 (online)

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Abstract

Like insulin, muscle contraction (in vitro or in situ) and exercise increase glucose uptake into skeletal muscle. However, the contraction/exercise pathway of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle is an independent pathway to that of insulin. Indeed, skeletal muscle glucose uptake is normal during exercise in those who suffer from insulin resistance and diabetes. Thus, the pathway of contraction-mediated glucose uptake into skeletal muscle provides an attractive potential target for pharmaceutical treatment and prevention of such conditions, especially as skeletal muscle is the major site of impaired glucose disposal in insulin resistance. The mechanisms regulating skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction have not been fully elucidated. Potential regulators include Ca2+ (via CaMK's and/or CaMKK), AMPK, ROS, and NO signaling, with some redundancy likely to be evident within the system. In this review, we attempt to briefly synthesize current evidence regarding the potential mechanisms involved in regulating skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction, focusing on ROS and NO signaling. While reading this review, it will become clear that this is an evolving field of research and that much more work is required to elucidate the mechanism(s) regulating skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID21971. muscles, AMPK, muscle contraction, CaMK, ROS, nitric oxide, NO, calcium, proteins, AMPK, muscle contraction, CaMK, ROS, nitric oxide, NO, calcium, proteins, metabolism
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2012 07:22
Last Modified: 12 Feb 2015 03:37
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/7939
DOI: 10.1002/iub.179
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Citations in Scopus: 17 - View on Scopus

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