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The effect of osteopathic treatment on people with chronic and sub-chronic neck pain

Lamaro, Josh (2004) The effect of osteopathic treatment on people with chronic and sub-chronic neck pain. Coursework Master thesis, Victoria University.

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Abstract

Neck pain is a common problem within our society, and can be severly disabling and costly to the sufferer. The aim of this single cohort study was to investigate the effect of osteopathic management of sub-chronic and chronic neck pain on perceived pain and disability. Seventeen participants (7 male, 10 female) who had experienced intermittent or constant neck pain for a duration of longer than one month were included in this study. The participants were offered a four-week course of osteopathic treatment at the Victoria University Osteopathic Medicine Clinic and were treated by senior osteopathic students using a semi-standardised treatment protocol. A Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and Neck Disability Index (NDI) were completed prior to the initial treatment and after treatments on weeks 2 and 4. Perceived intensity of neck pain, and perceived disability significantly reduced following four weeks of osteopathic management. This pilot study suggests that osteopathic treatment is effective for the management of chronic and sub-chronic neck pain. This minor thesis was written by a post-graduate student as part of the requirements of the Master of Health Science (Osteopathy) program.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: chronic neck pain, osteopathic treatment,Osteopathy Masters Project
Subjects: RFCD Classification > 320000 Medical and Health Sciences
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Biomedical and Health Sciences
Depositing User: Tracey Prelec
Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2008
Last Modified: 23 May 2013 16:39
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/847
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