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The effect of thoracolumbar high velocity low amplitutde manipulation on gross trunk rotational range of motion: is the position of the technique important?

Mudge, Patrick (2004) The effect of thoracolumbar high velocity low amplitutde manipulation on gross trunk rotational range of motion: is the position of the technique important? Coursework Master thesis, Victoria University.

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Abstract

High velocity low amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation is commonly used by manual therapists to treat motion restrictions in the spine. In the thoracolumbar spine, there are two ways that the manipulation is usually carried out: one with the patient lying on their side and another with the patient lying on their back. The aim of this controlled, single blinded study was to investigate the effect of these two thrust manipulations on the gross trunk rotational range of motion (GTR) of the spine in an asymptomatic population. Ninety subjects (57 female, 33 male) aged 18 to 40 years were randomly allocated into three intervention groups; receiving either a HVLA manipulation in the side-lying position, a HVLA manipulation in the supine position, or a sham treatment (control) allegedly consisting of functional technique. GTR measurements were made with the Axial Rotation Measuring Device No.3, utilising three-dimensional magnetometry. Measurements were recorded immediately before, immediately after and 30 minutes after treatment intervention. HVLA manipulation of the thoracolumbar spine produces significant increases in GTR in asymptomatic subjects. The positioning of the HVLA manipulation does not significantly affect the changes seen in GTR following intervention. This minor thesis was written by a post-graduate student as part of the requirements of the Master of Health Science (Osteopathy) program.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Osteopathy Masters Project, manipulation, thoracolumbar spine, gross trunk rotational range of motion, osteopathic treatment
Subjects: RFCD Classification > 320000 Medical and Health Sciences
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Biomedical and Health Sciences
Depositing User: Tracey Prelec
Date Deposited: 15 Jul 2008
Last Modified: 23 May 2013 16:39
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/853
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