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The effect of rapid rib raising technique on heart rate, respiratory rate, pain pressure threshold and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in asymptomatic participants

Williams, Khali (2005) The effect of rapid rib raising technique on heart rate, respiratory rate, pain pressure threshold and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in asymptomatic participants. Coursework Master thesis, Victoria University.

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Abstract

This study investigated the effects of rapid articulation on multiple levels of the costovertebral joints, using a rapid rib raising technique. The research was conducted as a randomised, cross-over, blinded, placebo controlled study. Thirty asymptomatic participants attended three sessions over a three week period. Measures of sympathetic output included blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and pain pressure threshold and were recorded at the end of each rest and intervention period. There was a significant increase in respiration rate after rapid articulation when compared to placebo and control groups. No other measures showed significant change. A rapid rib raising technique, when specifically targeting the sympathetic nervous supply of the lungs, creates an increase in respiration rate, and does not have a significant effect on heart rate, blood pressure or pain pressure threshold. This minor thesis was written by a post-graduate student as part of the requirements of the Master of Health Science (Osteopathy) program.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Osteopathy Masters Project, osteopathy, rapid rib raising technique, sympathetic nervous system, articulation, mobilisation
Subjects: RFCD Classification > 320000 Medical and Health Sciences
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Biomedical and Health Sciences
Depositing User: Tracey Prelec
Date Deposited: 08 Aug 2008
Last Modified: 23 May 2013 16:37
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/904
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