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Influence of osteopathic palpatory examination on sympathetic nervous system function: a pilot study

Boyd, Ross (2003) Influence of osteopathic palpatory examination on sympathetic nervous system function: a pilot study. Coursework Master thesis, Victoria University.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of osteopathic palpatory examination on sympathetic nervous system function. Fourteen participants (6 male and 8 female volunteers, age range 20-23 years) completed this study. An osteopathic screening examination of the thoracic spine, involving the assessment of the active, passive, active resisted and accessory ranges of motion and palpation of adjacent soft tissues. The placebo condition involved the examiner standing behind the seated participant. The examiner placed their hands on the participant's thoracic spine for a period of 5 minutes. The control condition involved examiner standing behind the seated participant with no physical contact between them. This was maintained for a period of 5 minutes. Examination condition produced a statistically significant 6.8% decrease in skin conductance. Control and placebo conditions did not produce a significant change in skin conductance. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate did not change significantly following the examination, control or placebo conditions. Osteopathic palpatory examination of the thoracic spine influences sympathetic nervous system function, significantly reducing electrical skin conductance. This minor thesis was written by a post-graduate student as part of the requirements of the Master of Health Science (Osteopathy) program.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Osteopathy Masters Project, osteopathic palpatory examination, sympathetic nervous system
Subjects: RFCD Classification > 320000 Medical and Health Sciences
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Biomedical and Health Sciences
Depositing User: Tracey Prelec
Date Deposited: 08 Aug 2008
Last Modified: 23 May 2013 16:37
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/906
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