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Acute nonhypothermic exposure to cold impedes motor skill performance in video gaming compared to thermo-neutral and hot conditions

Edwards, Andrew, Crowther, Robert G, Morton, Hugh and Polman, Remco (2011) Acute nonhypothermic exposure to cold impedes motor skill performance in video gaming compared to thermo-neutral and hot conditions. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 112 (1). pp. 217-227. ISSN 0031-5125

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Abstract

The study examined whether or not acute exposure to unfamiliar hot or cold conditions impairs performance of highly skilled coordinative activities and whether prior physical self-efficacy beliefs were associated with task completion. Nineteen volunteers completed both Guitar Hero® and Archery® activities as a test battery using the Nintendo Wii® console in cold (2°C), neutral (20°C), and hot (38°C) conditions. Participants all completed physical self-efficacy questionnaires following experimental familiarization. Performances of both Guitar Hero and Archery significantly decreased in the cold compared with the neutral condition. The cold trial was also perceived as the condition requiring both greater concentration and effort. There was no association between performance and physical self-efficacy. Performance of these coordinative tasks was compromised by acute (nonhypothermic) exposure to cold; the most likely explanation is that the cold condition presented a greater challenge to attentional processes as a form of environmental distraction.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID23820, ResPubID25017, hypothermia, motor performances, effects, environmental conditions, physical self-efficacy
Subjects: Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
FOR Classification > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
SEO Classification > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 24 Aug 2012 02:18
Last Modified: 03 Feb 2015 04:10
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/9214
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2466/25.PMS.112.1.217-227
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Citations in Scopus: 1 - View on Scopus

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