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Overtraining During Preseason: Stress and Negative Affective States Among Professional Rugby Union Players

Nicholls, Adam, McKenna, Jim, Polman, Remco and Backhouse, Suzanne (2011) Overtraining During Preseason: Stress and Negative Affective States Among Professional Rugby Union Players. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, 5 (3). pp. 211-222. ISSN 1932-9261 (print) 1932-927X (online)

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore the perceived factors that contribute to stress and negative affective states during preseason among a sample of professional rugby union players. The participants were 12 male professional rugby union players between 18 and 21 years of age (M age = 19 years, SD = 0.85). Data were collected via semistructured interviews and analyzed using an inductive content analysis procedure. Players identified training (structure and volume), the number of matches played and the recovery period, diet, sleep, and travel as factors that they believed contributed to their experience of stress and negative affective states. The present findings suggest that players may require more time to recover between matches, alongside interventions to help players manage the symptoms of stress and negative affect during times in which players are overtraining.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID23821, rugby union, training, performance, qualitative, interviews, affect
Subjects: Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
FOR Classification > 1701 Psychology
SEO Classification > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 24 Aug 2012 02:30
Last Modified: 31 May 2018 23:39
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/9215
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1123/jcsp.5.3.211
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Citations in Scopus: 4 - View on Scopus

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