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Behavioral Change Starts in the Family: The Role of Family Communication and Implications for Social Marketing

Watne, Torgeir and Brennan, Linda (2011) Behavioral Change Starts in the Family: The Role of Family Communication and Implications for Social Marketing. Journal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing, 23 (4). pp. 367-386. ISSN 1540-6997

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Abstract

This article investigates reciprocal consumer socialization in families, with a particular focus on the influence young adults above age 18 living at home have over their parents. A dyadic method of analysis was used to determine the level of influence young people have on the decision making of their parents with regard to the consumption of environmentally sustainable products. Our research shows that parents are not only influenced by their adolescent children, but that they are much more likely to take their children’s advice when the family foster open issue-based communication patterns with respect for others. Our findings show that when the parents initially encourage their children to develop their own opinions and at the same time uphold the family hierarchy, they are much more likely to take their children’s advice as well. For social marketers seeking to address issues of sustainable consumption, these are important findings.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID24004, consumer socialization, environmentally sustainable products, family decision making, family hierarchy, issue-based communication patterns, social marketers, sustainable consumption
Subjects: FOR Classification > 0502 Environmental Science and Management
FOR Classification > 1504 Services
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of International Business
SEO Classification > 9301 Learner and Learning
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2012 05:34
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2012 05:34
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/9284
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/10495142.2011.623526
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Citations in Scopus: 14 - View on Scopus

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