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The effects of vocal function exercises on the lung function of trained female singers: a pilot investigation

Price, Kate (2003) The effects of vocal function exercises on the lung function of trained female singers: a pilot investigation. Coursework Master thesis, Victoria University.

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Abstract

Vocal function exercises have been designed to strengthen and tone the muscles of the larynx and supporting musculature to enhance vocal function. The effect of these exercises on lung function is yet to be determined. Ten trained female volunteers participated in the current pilot study. All ten subjects performed vocal function exercises twice daily over a period of four weeks and their lung function was tested at the beginning and end of the four week period using Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in once second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio. Significant differences were found in both FEV1 (p=0.013) and FEV1/FVC ratio (P=0.009) after the completion of the exercises. This is most likely attributed to an increase in the power of the inspiratory muscles and greater muscular co-ordination, strength and endurance during exhalation. This minor thesis was written by a post-graduate student as part of the requirements of the Master of Health Science (Osteopathy) program.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master thesis)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Osteopathy Masters Project, vocal function exercises, lung function, female singers, inspiratory muscles
Subjects: RFCD Classification > 320000 Medical and Health Sciences
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Biomedical and Health Sciences
Depositing User: Tracey Prelec
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2008 23:22
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2017 08:51
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/929
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