Policy development and implementation : a multiple sector collaborative approach in social, health, and community fields

Frichitthavong, Phouthava (Tara) (2011) Policy development and implementation : a multiple sector collaborative approach in social, health, and community fields. PhD thesis, Victoria University.

Abstract

A multiple sector collaboration (MSC) approach to public health and social policy development and implementation is becoming the norm in postmodern cities and communities. The development of a theoretical framework in relation to MSC practice is still in its infancy. As an approach to policy development and implementation, MSC has been subjected to criticism for (a) its often value driven, complex, and time-consuming methods, and (b) the lack of measurable or tangible outcomes. The gaps found in the literature reveal a significant need for further evidence-based research that focuses on gaining greater insight into the operations of MSC and how the approach might contribute to improved social, health, and community outcomes. The aim of the present research is to close the identified gaps. Utilising a single-case approach, an existing and well-reputed MSC was selected for in-depth study over a 3-year period. Findings from this case study show that values, common purpose, group processes and dynamics, relationships, interactions, and synergy are vital components in the development and operation of a fully-functioning MSC.

Item type Thesis (PhD thesis)
URI http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/16040
Subjects Current > FOR Classification > 1605 Policy and Administration
Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Social Sciences and Psychology
Current > FOR Classification > 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Keywords policy development, policy implementation, government policy, health policy, community policy, social policy, health policy, multiple sector collaboration, MSC, health sector, community sector, World Health Organization, WHO
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