An Investigation of Two Methods for Quantifying Inter and Intra-Limb Control/Co-ordination Processes of Gait

Full text for this resource is not available from the Research Repository.

Taylor, Simon, Begg, Rezaul and Best, Russell (2002) An Investigation of Two Methods for Quantifying Inter and Intra-Limb Control/Co-ordination Processes of Gait. In: Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Modelling and Simulation. Zayegh, Aladin, ed. Victoria University, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 434-439.

Abstract

This paper examines two methods of measuring pattern dynamics for characterising the inter- and intra- limb processes underlying gait control/coordination. A sample of eighteen subjects completed a twenty-minute treadmill test. Minimum foot clearance values were taken at successive bilateral events. Using detrended fluctuation analysis, we computed α (self-similarity parameter), a measure of the degree to which a single value in a series of data is correlated with a previous and subsequent value over different time scales. Also, a ratio value ψ, provides a measure of the short term variability relative to long term variability obtained from the Poincaré plot. The two methods demonstrate a correlation between α and ψ for both intra-limb (r = -0.59) and interlimb processes (r = -0.64). Both methods indicate correlations existing within the control processes of intra- and inter-limb MFC events.

Additional Information

11-13 November, 2002, Melbourne, Australia

Item type Book Section
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/21414
ISBN 1862726175
Subjects Current > FOR Classification > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Current > FOR Classification > 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Sport and Exercise Science
Keywords gait control, fall, detrended fluctuation analysis, Poincaré cloud, Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, CDHAC, minimum foot clearance, MFC, spatial symmetry, healthy gait
Download/View statistics View download statistics for this item

Search Google Scholar

Repository staff login