A Review of Flight-Initiation Distances and their Application to Managing Disturbance to Australian Birds

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Weston, M. A, McLeod, Emily M, Blumstein, D. T and Guay, Patrick-Jean (2012) A Review of Flight-Initiation Distances and their Application to Managing Disturbance to Australian Birds. Emu : Austral Ornithology, 112 (4). pp. 269-286. ISSN 0158-4197 (print), 1448-5540 (online)

Abstract

Disturbance – the response of birds to a stimulus such as the presence of a person – is considered a conservation threat for some Australian birds. The distance at which a bird flees from perceived danger is defined as the flight-initiation distance (FID), and could be used to designate separation distances between birds and stimuli that might cause disturbance. We review the known FIDs for Australian birds, and report FIDs for 250 species. Most FIDs are from south-eastern Australia, and almost all refer to a single walker as the stimulus. Several prominent factors correlated with FID are discussed (e.g. body mass and the distance at which an approach begins). FIDs have not been used extensively in the management of disturbance, for a variety of reasons including lack and inaccessibility of available data. We call for standardised data collection and greater application of available data to the management of disturbance.

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Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/22210
DOI https://doi.org/10.1071/MU12026
Official URL http://www.publish.csiro.au/?act=view_file&file_id...
Subjects Current > FOR Classification > 0602 Ecology
Historical > SEO Classification > 9606 Environmental and Natural Resource Evaluation
Current > Division/Research > College of Science and Engineering
Keywords ResPubID25950, buffers, human–wildlife conflict, human–wildlife interactions, escape, flightiness, response
Citations in Scopus 133 - View on Scopus
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