Discourses of performance enhancement: can we separate performance enhancement from performance enhancing drug use?

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Outram, Simon M (2013) Discourses of performance enhancement: can we separate performance enhancement from performance enhancing drug use? Performance Enhancement & Health, 2 (3). pp. 94-100. ISSN 2211-2669

Abstract

The following paper sets out to analyse how the term ‘performance enhancement’ comes to be understood and utilised as a concept within discussions surrounding anti-doping in sport. At the most explicit level – that of discussing how we come to regulate drug use in sport – it is argued that performance enhancement is framed either as part of sport, the antithesis of sport, or an issue of health management. By contrast, it is suggested that it should not be assumed that performance enhancing drugs are necessarily efficacious. At a deeper analytical level it is argued that our regulatory understandings of performance enhancement are shaped by underlying tensions with respect to the significance of health and technology as elements of sport. By way of discussion and conclusion, it is argued that current social thinking on the issue of performance enhancement is contradictory with respect to values and practices. It is suggested that this contradiction stems from the overwhelming focus on performance enhancement as a form of drug abuse.

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Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/23803
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.peh.2013.08.015
Official URL http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S...
Subjects Historical > FOR Classification > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
Keywords enhancement, discourse, health, technology, drugs, regulation
Citations in Scopus 8 - View on Scopus
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