The effects of osteoarthritis, acute voluntary inactivity and injury on skeletal muscle function, Na+, K+ -ATPase content and isoform abundance

Perry, Ben D (2014) The effects of osteoarthritis, acute voluntary inactivity and injury on skeletal muscle function, Na+, K+ -ATPase content and isoform abundance. PhD thesis, Victoria University.

Abstract

Physical inactivity causes substantial maladaptions in each of skeletal muscle size, strength and endurance. In skeletal muscle the Na+, K+ -ATPase (NKA) enzyme is pivotal in the regulation of Na+ and K+ concentrations across the sarcolemmal and t-tubule membranes and hence in the maintenance of muscle excitability. The NKA content in skeletal muscle is increased by chronic physical activity and reduced by some crhronic injuries and diseases in humans. Knee osteoarthritis, aging, and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury adversely affects muscle mass, strength, and can lead to a reduction in physical activity. The detrimental functional effects seen in osteoarthritis and ACL injury may be partially attributable to physical inactivity. Hence, this thesis investigated the effects of several conditions and interventions that involve physical inactivity, including knee osteoarthritis (Study 1), voluntary limb unloading (Study 2) and ACL rupture (Study 3) on skeletal muscle function, muscle NKA content and NKA isoform abundance.

Item type Thesis (PhD thesis)
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/25837
Subjects Current > FOR Classification > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
Keywords physical inactivity, muscle fatigue, muscle excitability, functional impairment, knee osteoarthritis, voluntarty unilateral inactivity, ACL injury, age, unilateral limb unloading, resistance training, exercise performance, anterior cruciate ligament
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