Enhancing the relevance of Shared Socioeconomic Pathways for climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability research

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Van Ruijven, B, Levy, M, Agrawal, A, Biermann, F, Birkmann, J, Carter, T, Ebi, K, Garschagen, M, Jones, B, Jones, Roger ORCID: 0000-0001-6970-2797, Kemp-Benedict, E, Kok, M, Kok, K, Lemos, M, Lucas, P, Orlove, B, Pachauri, S, Parris, T, Patwardhan, A, Petersen, Arthur, Preston, B, Ribot, J, Rothman, D and Schweizer, V (2013) Enhancing the relevance of Shared Socioeconomic Pathways for climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability research. Climatic Change, 122 (3). 481 - 494. ISSN 0165-0009

Abstract

This paper discusses the role and relevance of the shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs) and the new scenarios that combine SSPs with representative concentration pathways (RCPs) for climate change impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability (IAV) research. It first provides an overview of uses of social–environmental scenarios in IAV studies and identifies the main shortcomings of earlier such scenarios. Second, the paper elaborates on two aspects of the SSPs and new scenarios that would improve their usefulness for IAV studies compared to earlier scenario sets: (i) enhancing their applicability while retaining coherence across spatial scales, and (ii) adding indicators of importance for projecting vulnerability. The paper therefore presents an agenda for future research, recommending that SSPs incorporate not only the standard variables of population and gross domestic product, but also indicators such as income distribution, spatial population, human health and governance.

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Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/26408
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-013-0931-0
Official URL http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-01...
Subjects Historical > FOR Classification > 1402 Applied Economics
Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > College of Business
Keywords adaptation; economic growth
Citations in Scopus 96 - View on Scopus
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