Muslim community organizations – sites of active citizenship or self-segregation?

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01419870.2016.1247975.pdf - Published Version (1MB)

Peucker, Mario ORCID: 0000-0003-1759-2578 and Ceylan, R (2016) Muslim community organizations – sites of active citizenship or self-segregation? Ethnic and Racial Studies. ISSN 0141-9870

Abstract

Ethno-religious community organizations in Western countries have often been described as being disconnected from mainstream society, and Muslim community groups have been a special focus of such critique. This article offers a counter-narrative to these widespread allegations. It draws on a synthesis of emerging research on the citizenship-enhancing effects of mosque involvement and on an explorative study involving thirty in-depth interviews with civically active Muslims in Australia and Germany. The article examines the potential of Muslim community organizations to mobilize their member into performing their citizenship through civic and political participation. It offers empirical evidence that many Muslim community organizations, rather than promoting social segregation, act as accessible entry point for Muslims’ civic participation, facilitate cross-community engagement and provide gateways to political involvement. These civic potentials of Muslim community organization have remained underestimated in the public and political discourse on cohesive societies and healthy democracies.

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Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/31974
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2016.1247975
Official URL http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/014198...
Subjects Historical > FOR Classification > 1606 Political Science
Historical > FOR Classification > 1608 Sociology
Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Centre for Cultural Diversity and Wellbeing
Keywords Community organizations; Muslims; Citizenship; mosques; social capital; Participation
Citations in Scopus 10 - View on Scopus
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