Critical Factors Influencing ICT Adoption within a Thailand Government Department

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Waehama, Wanamina (2017) Critical Factors Influencing ICT Adoption within a Thailand Government Department. Other Degree thesis, Victoria University.

Abstract

An increasing need for service efficiency has influenced the need for the adoption of e- government across all governmental departments and agencies. However, in many developing countries such initiatives face numerous challenges, which slowed their implementation down or reduced their effectiveness. This study assessed factors influencing the adoption of the Government Fiscal Management Information System (GFMIS), a Thai e-government initiative, by the employees of the Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives (MOAC). Identification of such inhibitory factors may be used to reduce their influence on use of the GFMIS in the MOAC, and more generally, be used to improve performance of similar existing Thai e-government initiatives and improve adoption of future ones. An extended model was devised based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) devised by Ventakesh et al. 2003. This model was empirically tested using structural equation modelling (SEM) analysis with responses from a usable sample size of 315 (after deleting univariate and multivariate outliers, and excluding incomplete responses). SEM analysis on the Extended UTAUT model showed a poor fit. A modified version of the original UTAUT, the Adapted Original UTAUT, was tested in the same way and found to have a good fit. Path analysis of the Adapted Original UTAUT model showed a number of differences from the Original UTAUT model it was modified from. The Effort Expectancy construct had no significant effects on either Intention to Use Future Technologies or Use Behaviour. Since the effects of this construct are widely reported to decrease with experience of the system, this may indicate that the employees have become used to the GFMIS since its introduction in 2007. The Facilitating Conditions and Performance Expectancy constructs had significant positive influences on both Intention to Use Future Technologies and Use Behaviour. Oddly, the Social Influence construct had a significant positive effect on Intention to Use New Technologies while having a significant negative effect on Use Behaviour. This, combined with the lack of a significant relationship between the Intention to Use Future Technologies and the Use Behaviour constructs, suggests that there may be a gap between what employees of the MOAC say about the GFMIS and how they make use of it. Non-parametric tests showed Age, Gender and Education Level of respondents moderated the effects of the Social Influence construct. Similar tests showed that Age and Education Level of respondents moderated the effects of the Facilitating Conditions construct (which has a significant positive effect on both Intention to Use Future Technologies and Use Behaviour). None of the demographic factors moderated the effects of the Performance Expectancy construct, suggesting that the benefits of using the GFMIS are accepted by all employees. Regardless of the details learned about hesitancy in future research; workshops and training sessions to ameliorate problems are in order immediately. Educational aids need to be of high quality and continuous, which will enhance the integration of GFMIS into Thailand’s e- government system.

Additional Information

Doctor of Business Administration

Item type Thesis (Other Degree thesis)
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/41842
Subjects Current > FOR Classification > 1503 Business and Management
Current > Division/Research > VU School of Business
Keywords e-government; developing countries; Thailand; Government Fiscal Management Information System; GFMIS; Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology; UTAUT model; Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives; MOAC
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