Examining the effects of caffeine on isokinetic strength, power, and endurance

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Grgic, Jozo ORCID: 0000-0002-6929-2844, Venier, Sandro and Mikulic, Pavle ORCID: 0000-0003-1244-631X (2022) Examining the effects of caffeine on isokinetic strength, power, and endurance. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology, 7 (4). ISSN 2411-5142

Abstract

This study examined caffeine’s effects on isokinetic strength, power, and endurance. The sample included 25 young, resistance-trained males. The participants were tested on three occasions, in a control trial (no substance ingestion) and following the ingestion of 6 mg·kg−1 of caffeine or placebo. Exercise tests involved isokinetic knee extension and flexion using angular velocities of 60° s−1 and 180° s−1. Analyzed outcomes included peak torque, average power, and total work. For knee extension at an angular velocity of 60° s−1, there were significant differences for: (1) peak torque when comparing caffeine vs. control (Hedges’ g = 0.22) and caffeine vs. placebo (g = 0.30) and (2) average power when comparing caffeine vs. control (g = 0.21) and caffeine vs. placebo (g = 0.29). For knee extension at an angular velocity of 180° s−1, there were significant differences for: (1) peak torque when comparing caffeine vs. placebo (g = 0.26), (2) average power when comparing caffeine vs. control (g = 0.36) and caffeine vs. placebo (g = 0.43), and (3) total work when comparing caffeine vs. control (g = 0.33) and caffeine vs. placebo (g = 0.36). Caffeine was not ergogenic for knee flexors in any of the analyzed outcomes. Additionally, there was no significant difference between control and placebo. In summary, caffeine enhances the mechanical output of the knee extensors at lower and higher angular velocities, and these effects are present when compared to placebo ingestion or no substance ingestion (control).

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Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/44425
DOI https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk7040071
Official URL https://www.mdpi.com/2411-5142/7/4/71
Subjects Current > FOR (2020) Classification > 3210 Nutrition and dietetics
Current > FOR (2020) Classification > 4207 Sports science and exercise
Current > Division/Research > Institute for Health and Sport
Keywords exercise physiology, sports and nutrition, caffeine, training, endurance
Citations in Scopus 0 - View on Scopus
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