Precompetitive state anxiety, objective and subjective performance, and causal attributions in competitive swimmers

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Polman, Remco, Rowcliffe, Naomi, Borkoles, Erika and Levy, Andrew R (2007) Precompetitive state anxiety, objective and subjective performance, and causal attributions in competitive swimmers. Pediatric Exercise Science, 19 (1). pp. 39-50. ISSN 0899-8493

Abstract

This study investigated the nature of the relationship between precompetitive state anxiety (CSAI-2C), subjective (race position) and objective (satisfaction) performance outcomes, and self-rated causal attributions (CDS-IIC) for performance in competitive child swimmers. Race position, subjective satisfaction, self-confidence, and, to a lesser extent, cognitive state anxiety (but not somatic state anxiety) were associated with the attributions provided by the children for their swimming performance. The study partially supported the self-serving bias hypothesis; winners used the ego-enhancing attributional strategy, but the losers did not use an ego-protecting attributional style. Age but not gender appeared to influence the attributions provided in achievement situations.

Additional Information

Online ISSN: 1543-2920

Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/7913
Subjects Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
Historical > FOR Classification > 1701 Psychology
Keywords ResPubID21935. CDS-IIC, children, CSAI-2C, ego, anxiety, competitive child swimmers, swimming, child athletes, performance
Citations in Scopus 11 - View on Scopus
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