Information Systems Development as an Emergent Knowledge Research Process

Full text for this resource is not available from the Research Repository.

Pornphol, Putsadee and McGrath, Michael (2011) Information Systems Development as an Emergent Knowledge Research Process. International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, 6 (1). pp. 301-318. ISSN 1833-1882

Abstract

A view of the information system as a research conceptual framework is presented. A parallel is drawn with the manner in which knowledge emerges in iterative case study research. In this paper, our principal objective is to illustrate this ‘emergent knowledge process’ through the staged development of a decision support system (DSS) based upon the ‘tourism area life cycle’ (TALC) model. The TALC is a theory of tourism region evolution designed to assist destination managers and others in dealing with and understanding problems that seem to almost inevitably arise with concentrated tourism development (e.g. environmental despoilment, low visitor yield and social issues). Various heuristics are associated with the transformation from one life cycle stage to the next and these, together with an increasing body of cases dealing with the application of rejuvenation strategies, form the basis of our DSS. It is demonstrated that, as the DSS evolves through a number of cycles (each cycle being the result of DSS application to a new destination), our knowledge of the TALC domain is enhanced and refined in much the same way as would occur with a more conventional case study approach.

Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/9110
Subjects Historical > FOR Classification > 0806 Information Systems
Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Management and Information Systems
Historical > SEO Classification > 9003 Tourism
Keywords ResPubID23531, information systems development, research methodologies, tourism area life cycle
Citations in Scopus 1 - View on Scopus
Download/View statistics View download statistics for this item

Search Google Scholar

Repository staff login