Investigating the anticipatory nature of pattern perception in sport

Full text for this resource is not available from the Research Repository.

Gorman, Adam D, Abernethy, B and Farrow, Damian ORCID: 0000-0002-5020-7910 (2011) Investigating the anticipatory nature of pattern perception in sport. Memory and Cognition, 39 (5). pp. 894-901. ISSN 0090-502X (print) 1532-5946 (online)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to examine the anticipatory nature of pattern perception in sport by using static and moving basketball patterns across three different display types. Participants of differing skill levels were included in order to determine whether the effects would be moderated by the knowledge and experience of the observer in the same manner reported previously for simple images. The results from a pattern recognition task showed that both expert and recreational participants were more likely to anticipate the next likely state of a pattern when it was presented as a moving video, but only the experts appeared to have the depth of understanding required to elicit the same anticipatory encoding for patterns presented as schematic images. The results extend those reported in previous research and provide further evidence of an anticipatory encoding in pattern perception for images containing complex, interrelated patterns.

Dimensions Badge

Altmetric Badge

Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/9168
DOI https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-010-0067-7
Official URL http://link.springer.com/article/10.3758/s13421-01...
Subjects Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL)
Historical > FOR Classification > 1701 Psychology
Historical > SEO Classification > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Keywords ResPubID23692, representational momentum, anticipation, pattern perception, expertise, transfer
Citations in Scopus 36 - View on Scopus
Download/View statistics View download statistics for this item

Search Google Scholar

Repository staff login