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“Resilient Young Smokers” - A Proposed Study in Determining Young Adult Smokers’ Responses Towards Anti-Smoking Initiatives in Australia

Liau, Chee how ORCID: 0000-0002-9226-5617, White, Leanne ORCID: 0000-0002-7898-0091, Thomas, Keith and Tan, Seng Teck (2018) “Resilient Young Smokers” - A Proposed Study in Determining Young Adult Smokers’ Responses Towards Anti-Smoking Initiatives in Australia. Asian Social Science, 14 (10). 91 - 101. ISSN 1911-2017

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Abstract

Although cigarette smoking rate has declined consistently in the past four decades in Australia, the smoking habit remains popular among some groups. From a marketer’s vantage point, this slowed reduction portrays the less effective implementation of anti-smoking campaigns in Australia. Ideally, each anti-smoking intervention ought to break the chain of marginal utility and lead to a sharp or stepped decline of smoking prevalence. This paper explores the inadequacies of fear factored anti-smoking campaigns and some prevailing reasons why young adult smokers continue to smoke. This paper begins with a review and categorisation of the different reasons of why young adults continue to smoke. These reasons draw on addiction, stress, habit, social-economic factors, self-identity and peer pressure. The rationale for studying these anti-smoking initiatives is to evaluate if these initiatives address the issues of smoking amongst young adults. This paper is significant for formulating effective anti-smoking messages and policy developments in Australia.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: smoking habit; anti-smoking messages; tobacco control policy
Subjects: FOR Classification > 1505 Marketing
FOR Classification > 1605 Policy and Administration
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > College of Business
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 06 Nov 2018 22:27
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2018 00:50
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/37193
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5539/ass.v14n10p91
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