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The Advantages of Mobile Solutions for Chronic Disease Management

Wickramasinghe, Nilmini and Tatnall, Arthur and Goldberg, Steve (2011) The Advantages of Mobile Solutions for Chronic Disease Management. In: Proceedings of the 15th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (PACIS) 2011 : ‬Quality Research in Pacific Asia. Seddon, Peter and Gregor, Shirley, eds. Faculty of Science & technology, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane.

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Abstract

In an environment of escalating healthcare costs, chronic disease management is particularly challenging, since, by definition such diseases have no foreseeable cure and if poorly managed typically lead to further, complicated secondary health issues, which ultimately only serve to exacerbate cost. Diabetes is one of the leading chronic diseases and its prevalence continues to rise exponentially. Thus it behooves all to focus on solutions that can result in superior management of this disease. Hence, the following presents findings from a longitudinal exploratory case study that examined the application of a pervasive technology solution; a mobile phone, to provide superior diabetes self-care. The conclusions highlight the benefits of a pervasive technology solution for supporting superior self-care in the context of chronic disease. Moreover, it is proffered that by employing the theories of Actor Network and Social Network Analysis the full benefits of this technology enabled solution can be identified. --PACIS 2011 held: Brisbane, 7-11 July, 2011

Item Type: Book Section
ISBN: 9781864356441
Uncontrolled Keywords: ResPubID23851, pervasive wireless solution, chronic disease, healthcare, actor-network theory, social network analysis
Subjects: FOR Classification > 0805 Distributed Computing
FOR Classification > 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > School of Management and Information Systems
SEO Classification > 9305 Education and Training Systems
Depositing User: VUIR
Date Deposited: 02 Aug 2013 06:42
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2013 06:42
URI: http://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/9639
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Citations in Scopus: 0 - View on Scopus

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