Construction industry apprentices’ substance use: A survey of prevalence rates, reasons for use, and regional and age differences

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du Plessis, Karin and Corney, Tim ORCID: 0000-0002-1980-6835 (2011) Construction industry apprentices’ substance use: A survey of prevalence rates, reasons for use, and regional and age differences. Youth Studies Australia, 30 (4). pp. 40-50. ISSN 1038-2569 (print) 1839-4914 (online)

Abstract

Prevalence rates and reasons for substance use were studied in a sample of 172 male construction industry apprentices who had a mean age of 20 years. Results were compared with those of men in similar age groups in Victoria, and regional and age differences were explored. Findings indicate that more metropolitan apprentices had experimented with cannabis, amphetamines and cocaine than their rural/regional counterparts. However, more rural apprentices indicated consuming alcohol than their metropolitan counterparts. Apart from alcohol use, older apprentices (aged 20 years and over) were also more likely to have used cannabis, amphetamines and cocaine than younger apprentices (aged 15–19 years). The majority of apprentices used substances for enjoyment (“It is fun/I like it”) or social reasons (“Friends use it”). The findings are discussed in the context of the literature, and suggestions for future research are made.

Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/24849
Subjects Historical > FOR Classification > 1608 Sociology
Historical > FOR Classification > 1701 Psychology
Historical > Faculty/School/Research Centre/Department > College of Education
Keywords substance use, construction industry, young working men, apprentice, risk, intervention, comparative analysis
Citations in Scopus 2 - View on Scopus
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