Blending an implementation science framework with principles of proportionate universalism to support physical activity promotion in primary healthcare while addressing health inequities

Klepac Pogrmilovic, Bojana ORCID: 0000-0002-9141-1862, Linke, S and Craike, Melinda ORCID: 0000-0002-7374-1286 (2021) Blending an implementation science framework with principles of proportionate universalism to support physical activity promotion in primary healthcare while addressing health inequities. Health Research Policy and Systems, 19 (1). ISSN 1478-4505

Abstract

Globally, insufficient physical activity (PA) is one of the main risk factors for premature mortality. Although insufficient PA is prevalent in nearly every demographic, people with socio-economic disadvantage participate in lower levels of PA than those who are more affluent, and this contributes to widening health inequities. PA promotion interventions in primary healthcare are effective and cost effective, however they are not widely implemented in practice. Further, current approaches that adopt a ‘universal’ approach to PA promotion do not consider or address the additional barriers experienced by people who experience socioeconomic disadvantages. To address the research to policy and practice gap, and taking Australia as a case study, this commentary proposes a novel model which blends an implementation science framework with the principles of proportionate universalism. Proportionate universalism is a principle suggesting that health interventions and policies need to be universal, not targeted, but with intensity and scale proportionate to the level of social need and/or disadvantage. Within this model, we propose interrelated and multi-level evidence-based policies and strategies to support PA promotion in primary healthcare while addressing health inequities. The principles outlined in the new model which blends proportionate (Pro) universalism principles and Practical, Robust Implementation and Sustainability Model (PRISM), ‘ProPRISM’ can be applied to the implementation of PA promotion interventions in health care settings in other high-income countries. Future studies should test the model and provide evidence of its effectiveness in improving implementation and patient health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. There is potential to expand the proposed model to other health sectors (e.g., secondary and tertiary care) and to address other chronic disease risk factors such as unhealthy diet, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Therefore, this approach has the potential to transform the delivery of health care to a prevention-focused health service model, which could reduce the prevalence and burden of chronic disease and health care costs in high-income countries.

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Item type Article
URI https://vuir.vu.edu.au/id/eprint/42412
DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/s12961-020-00672-z
Official URL https://health-policy-systems.biomedcentral.com/ar...
Subjects Current > FOR (2020) Classification > 4203 Health services and systems
Current > FOR (2020) Classification > 4206 Public health
Current > Division/Research > Institute for Health and Sport
Current > Division/Research > Mitchell Institute
Keywords health inequities, Australia, universalism, socio-economically disadvantaged groups, physical activity promotion
Citations in Scopus 0 - View on Scopus
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